Taking IBRANCE

Taking IBRANCE

Combination Therapy For Metastatic Breast Cancer

IBRANCE® (palbociclib) is taken with a hormonal therapy and is used to treat hormone receptor positive, HER2- metastatic breast cancer. In combination with any aromatase inhibitor,* IBRANCE is for postmenopausal women as their first hormonal based therapy. In combination with fulvestrant, IBRANCE is for women who have previously received hormonal therapy for their disease. IBRANCE combination therapy was studied in 2 different clinical trials. Whether you’ve previously received hormonal therapy for your metastatic disease before or not, talk to your healthcare team to learn if IBRANCE is right for you.

*Aromatase inhibitor is a class of therapy that includes: letrozole, anastrozole, and exemestane.

 

Taking IBRANCE - Tab - AROMATASE INHIBITOR & FULVESTRANT

Delayed Disease Progression
By A Median Of
Delayed Disease
Progression By A Median Of
 
 

IBRANCE was studied in a clinical trial of 666 postmenopausal women with ER+/HER2- metastatic breast cancer who had not received prior hormone therapy for their metastatic disease. Patients were split into 2 groups. The first group took IBRANCE and letrozole (an aromatase inhibitor) together, while the second group took letrozole and placebo.

Delayed disease progression. Median time to disease progression
Median time to disease progression with a combination therapy for a certain type of MBC
444 patients took IBRANCE plus Letrozole compared to 222 patients took letrozole plus placebo in a clinical trial

Together, the combination of IBRANCE and letrozole delayed disease progression for a median time of 24.8 months versus 14.5 months for those that received letrozole and placebo. Patients taking IBRANCE with letrozole reduced their risk of disease progression by 42% compared to those taking letrozole and placebo.

This means that IBRANCE plus letrozole was significantly more effective at delaying disease progression versus letrozole and placebo.

Shrinking The Tumor

In the same clinical trial, tumor response to treatment was measured. The results showed that in patients taking IBRANCE and letrozole, tumor response was 55% — meaning more than half of these patients saw their tumors shrink in size — compared to 44% who took letrozole and placebo.

Dosing For IBRANCE + An Aromatase Inhibitor

Dosing chart for a combination therapy for a certain type of MBC

IBRANCE and an aromatase inhibitor are taken orally in a 4-week cycle. For the first 3 weeks (21 days), you‘ll take one IBRANCE and one aromatase inhibitor pill every day. Then for the last week (7 days), you’ll take only one pill — an aromatase inhibitor. At the end of 4 weeks, the cycle will start over again. Your healthcare team will monitor your therapy throughout.

Dosing chart for IBRANCE plus an Aromatase Inhibitor

For illustrative purposes only.

IBRANCE and an aromatase inhibitor are taken orally in a 4-week cycle. For the first 3 weeks (21 days), you‘ll take one IBRANCE and one aromatase inhibitor pill every day. Then for the last week (7 days), you’ll take only one pill — an aromatase inhibitor. At the end of 4 weeks, the cycle will start over again. Your healthcare team will monitor your therapy throughout.

Even though you’ll stop taking IBRANCE for the last week of each cycle, an aromatase inhibitor should be taken every day throughout your therapy. It should even be taken if your healthcare team stops your treatment with IBRANCE or adjusts your dose. But before making any changes, check with your healthcare team to make sure you’re taking your prescriptions correctly.

 
Download our Dosing Tracker to track when to take IBRANCE and an aromatase inhibitor.
Learn about taking IBRANCE + fulvestrant
Delayed Disease Progression
Delayed Disease Progression
 
 

IBRANCE was studied in a clinical trial of 521 women with hormone receptor positive/HER2- metastatic breast cancer, regardless of their menopausal state, who had received hormone therapy either for early stage breast cancer or for metastatic disease. Hormone receptor positive includes both estrogen receptor positive (ER+) and/or progesterone receptor positive (PR+) subtypes. Patients were split into 2 groups. The first group took IBRANCE and fulvestrant together, while the second group took fulvestrant and placebo.

Delayed disease progression. Median time to disease progression
Median time to disease progression with a combination therapy for a certain type of MBC


Together, the combination of IBRANCE and fulvestrant delayed disease progression for a median time of 9.5 months versus 4.6 months for those that received fulvestrant and placebo. Patients taking IBRANCE with fulvestrant reduced their risk of disease progression by 54% compared to those taking fulvestrant and placebo.

This means that IBRANCE plus fulvestrant was 2x more effective at delaying disease progression versus fulvestrant and placebo.

Shrinking The Tumor

In the same clinical trial, tumor response to treatment was measured. The results showed that in patients taking IBRANCE and fulvestrant, tumor response was 24.6% — meaning 24.6% of these patients saw their tumors shrink in size — compared to 10.9% who took fulvestrant and placebo.

Dosing For IBRANCE + Fulvestrant

IBRANCE is taken orally over a 4-week cycle. For the first 3 weeks (21 days), you‘ll take one IBRANCE pill every day. Then for the last week (7 days), you won’t take IBRANCE. At the end of 4 weeks, the cycle will start over again. Your healthcare team will monitor your therapy throughout.

Dosing schedule for IBRANCE taken in combination with Fulvestrant
Dosing schedule for a treatment for a certain type of MBC in combination with a hormonal therapy

For illustrative purposes only.

IBRANCE is taken orally over a 4-week cycle. For the first 3 weeks (21 days), you‘ll take one IBRANCE pill every day. Then for the last week (7 days), you won’t take IBRANCE. At the end of 4 weeks, the cycle will start over again. Your healthcare team will monitor your therapy throughout.

Fulvestrant is an intramuscular injection that is administered by your healthcare provider. Each treatment is given as 2 injections (for a 500-mg total dose). Fulvestrant requires 3 doses during the first month of treatment. Your healthcare provider will give you one dose on days 1, 15, and 29 of the first month and then a single dose once a month thereafter. Please refer to the chart above, and be sure to discuss scheduling your injection appointments with your healthcare team.

 
Download our Dosing Tracker to track when to take IBRANCE and fulvestrant.
Learn about taking IBRANCE + an aromatase inhibitor

 

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Taking IBRANCE® (palbociclib) Capsules for MBC | Safety Info
See risks and benefits of IBRANCE. Learn how IBRANCE® (palbociclib) capsules are taken in combination with an aromatase inhibitor or fulvestrant.
Considerations & Monitoring

Before You Start

 

Your healthcare team will prescribe IBRANCE (palbociclib) in combination with either an aromatase inhibitor or fulvestrant.

Before taking IBRANCE it’s important to talk to your healthcare team about any health issues or other medications you’re taking, including prescription medicines, over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. IBRANCE and other medicines may affect each other and cause side effects.

Additionally, before you take IBRANCE, tell your healthcare provider if you: have fever, chills, or any other signs or symptoms of infection; have liver or kidney problems; and/or have any other medical conditions.

Tell your healthcare provider if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant; IBRANCE can harm your unborn baby. Females who are able to become pregnant and who take IBRANCE should use effective birth control during treatment and for at least 3 weeks after stopping IBRANCE. Males who are taking IBRANCE and have female partners who can become pregnant should use effective birth control during treatment with IBRANCE and for 3 months after the final dose of IBRANCE.

Tell your healthcare provider if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed; it is not known if IBRANCE passes into your breast milk. You and your healthcare provider should decide if you will take IBRANCE or breastfeed. You should not do both.

 

Tips For Taking IBRANCE

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Monitoring Your Therapy

To monitor side effects, your healthcare team will give you a blood test to check your complete blood cell count before you start taking IBRANCE and at the beginning of every cycle.

Additionally, for the first 2 treatment cycles, you'll need a complete blood cell count done on day 15 as well. Make sure to tell your healthcare team which day you start your first and second cycles so they can schedule your day 15 appointment at the right time.

A complete blood cell count is the only monitoring requirement for IBRANCE. Patients taking IBRANCE do not require EKG heart monitoring. Your healthcare team will determine if any additional monitoring is needed.

If your blood test results indicate low white blood cell counts (neutropenia), your healthcare team may temporarily hold or adjust your dose. Many people have their doses modified during treatment. Be sure to follow your dosing schedule exactly as your healthcare team prescribes and talk to your doctor if you have any questions about monitoring.

Safety Info | IBRANCE® (palbociclib) Capsules Considerations & Monitoring
See risks and benefits of IBRANCE. Find tips for taking IBRANCE® (palbociclib) capsules for metastatic breast cancer and how to monitor your side effects.
Side Effects & Tips

What You Should Be Aware Of

While on therapy, be sure to share any side effects you experience with your healthcare team right away.

Serious Side Effects

  • Low white blood cell counts (neutropenia) are very common when taking IBRANCE (palbociclib) and may cause serious infections that can lead to death. Your healthcare team should check your white blood cell counts before and during treatment.
  • If you develop low white blood cell counts during treatment with IBRANCE, your doctor may stop your treatment, decrease your dose, or may tell you to wait to begin your treatment cycle. Tell your doctor right away if you have signs and symptoms of low white blood cell counts or infections such as fever and chills.

Common Side Effects

  • In addition to low white blood cell counts (neutropenia), low red blood cell counts and low platelet counts are common with IBRANCE. Call your healthcare team right away if you feel dizzy or weak, notice that you bleed or bruise more easily, or experience shortness of breath or nosebleeds while on treatment.
  • Other common side effects include infections, tiredness, nausea, sore mouth, abnormalities in liver blood tests, diarrhea, hair thinning or hair loss, vomiting, rash, and loss of appetite.
Not all of the 
possible side effects are 
listed here. For more 
information, talk to your 
doctor, nurse, or 
pharmacist.

Side Effect Tips

Before you make any changes to your diet or exercise routine, consult with your healthcare team. Also note that these tips are not specific to lBRANCE and that if you do experience any side effects, share them with your healthcare team early so that they can help you manage them.

 

Considerations & Monitoring - Carousel - Side Effect Tips

It’s important to take steps to protect yourself against infection throughout your treatment:

  • Tell your healthcare team right away if you have fever, chills, or any other signs or symptoms of infection.
  • Wash your hands often.
  • Clean vegetables and fruits and store them at the right temperatures.
  • Avoid exposure to people who might be sick.

If you’re feeling nauseated or are vomiting, it’s best to talk to your healthcare team. They can give you instructions on how to deal with your symptoms. In addition to your healthcare team’s instructions, following these tips may help:

  • Try to eat 5 or 6 small meals a day instead of 3 large ones.
  • Since dehydration may contribute to nausea, sip water throughout the day.
  • Consider relaxation techniques, such as deep breathing.

During treatment you go through a lot, both physically and mentally. And this could leave you feeling tired or weak. In addition to your healthcare team's instructions, following these tips may help:

  • Build a schedule to make sure you’re getting rest and activity.
    • Take short naps or breaks.
    • Try doing light exercise each day. But make sure you talk to your healthcare team before you make any changes.
  • Eat well and drink plenty of fluids. Sometimes tiredness and weakness can be caused by dehydration.
  • Support groups may be able to help you manage stress and work through things that are making you tired.
  • Do things that are relaxing, such as listening to music or reading.

If you have diarrhea, tell your healthcare team. But also take a closer look at your diet. Certain foods and drinks can make diarrhea worse or better. Following these tips may help to alleviate diarrhea symptoms:

  • Eat small meals several times a day instead of 3 big ones.
  • Take small sips of water often.
  • Limit dairy products and raw vegetables, and avoid spicy foods.
  • Avoid drinks with alcohol or caffeine.

It’s important to check your mouth and tongue daily for sores, white spots, or infections, and inform your healthcare team about any changes right away. If you do have a sore mouth, follow these tips:

  • Avoid tobacco, drinking alcohol, and spicy and acidic foods.
  • Eat foods that are soft and easy to chew or swallow.
  • If you have mouth pain, sucking on ice chips or Popsicles® may help.

It’s important to take steps to protect yourself against infection throughout your treatment:

  • Tell your healthcare team right away if you have fever, chills, or any other signs or symptoms of infection.
  • Wash your hands often.
  • Clean vegetables and fruits and store them at the right temperatures.
  • Avoid exposure to people who might be sick.

If you’re feeling nauseated or are vomiting, it’s best to talk to your healthcare team. They can give you instructions on how to deal with your symptoms. In addition to your healthcare team’s instructions, following these tips may help:

  • Try to eat 5 or 6 small meals a day instead of 3 large ones.
  • Since dehydration may contribute to nausea, sip water throughout the day.
  • Consider relaxation techniques, such as deep breathing.

During treatment you go through a lot, both physically and mentally. And this could leave you feeling tired or weak. In addition to your healthcare team's instructions, following these tips may help:

  • Build a schedule to make sure you’re getting rest and activity.
    • Take short naps or breaks.
    • Try doing light exercise each day. But make sure you talk to your healthcare team before you make any changes.
  • Eat well and drink plenty of fluids. Sometimes tiredness and weakness can be caused by dehydration.
  • Support groups may be able to help you manage stress and work through things that are making you tired.
  • Do things that are relaxing, such as listening to music or reading.

If you have diarrhea, tell your healthcare team. But also take a closer look at your diet. Certain foods and drinks can make diarrhea worse or better. Following these tips may help to alleviate diarrhea symptoms:

  • Eat small meals several times a day instead of 3 big ones.
  • Take small sips of water often.
  • Limit dairy products and raw vegetables, and avoid spicy foods.
  • Avoid drinks with alcohol or caffeine.

It’s important to check your mouth and tongue daily for sores, white spots, or infections, and inform your healthcare team about any changes right away. If you do have a sore mouth, follow these tips:

  • Avoid tobacco, drinking alcohol, and spicy and acidic foods.
  • Eat foods that are soft and easy to chew or swallow.
  • If you have mouth pain, sucking on ice chips or Popsicles® may help.
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Side Effects of IBRANCE® (palbociclib) Capsules | Safety Info
See risks and benefits of IBRANCE. Read about side effects and management tips for those taking IBRANCE® (palbociclib) capsules for metastatic breast cancer.
Side Effects & Tips

Talk To Your Healthcare Professional About Any Side Effects You Experience

Your doctor or nurse wants to know how you’re feeling and how well you’re tolerating your medication. Speak up if you have any side effects—your doctor may want to adjust your dose or there may be lifestyle adjustments that can help you feel better.

Talking IBRANCE with a nurse